STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.2

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

I find I hated the Six Hats being six adjectives in STL R0.1 so I am changing them back to verbs:

  1. CREATE refers to the creation of entities. Meaning. Capability.
  2. RELATE refers to the creation of relationships. Uniqueness. Portability.
  3. REPORT refers to the creation of attributes. Value. Reliability.
  4. RECORD refers to the creation of constraints. Business Plan. Profitability.
  5. AFFORD refers to the creation of affordances. Adoption. Usability.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the creation of manipulations. Evangelism. Availability.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r02_1.jpg

INDUCE and DEDUCE will be changed to the adjectives INDUCED and DEDUCED.

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on Release 0.2 of the syntax:

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname;

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                ); 

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename; 

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname; 

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
 	(	SELECT,
 		INSERT,
 		UPDATE,
 		DELETE
 	); 

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

That’s it for now. Time to get some sleep.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.2

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STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.1

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

Since I posted STL: Structured Thinking Language and STL: Structured Thinking Language (remix), I have made quite a bit of progress in my thinking regarding the syntax of Structured Thinking Language.

The Six Hats are no longer verbs. There are only two verbs in STL, INDUCE and DEDUCE. INDUCE is a bottom up process of learning the structure of a system. DEDUCE is a top down process of teaching the structure of a system. INDUCE observes and orients. DEDUCE decides and acts. All STL statements begin with the INDUCE or DEDUCE verb to determine whether you are referring to an existing or a new system.

Each of the verbs can also be IMPLICIT or EXPLICIT according to the definitions found in Implicity and Explicity.

The Six Hats are now six adjectives:

  1. CONCEPTUAL refers to the creation of entities. Revise. Creativity. Meaning.
  2. CONTEXTUAL refers to the creation of relationships. Relate. Relativity. Uniqueness.
  3. LOGICAL refers to the creation of attributes. Report. Optimicity. Benefit.
  4. PHYSICAL refers to the creation of constraints. Record. Pessimicity. Cost.
  5. MECHANICAL refers to the creation of affordances. Intuit. Anthropicity. Usability.
  6. OPERATIONAL refers to the creation of manipulations. Engage. Synchronicity. Convenience.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r01_3.jpg

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on the syntax:

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
CONCEPTUAL NOUN.nounname;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
CONTEXTUAL NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                );    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
LOGICAL     NOUN.nounname.attributename;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
PHYSICAL    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
MECHANICAL      NOUN.nounname
		(	select,
			insert,
			update,
			delete
		);    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
OPERATIONAL    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

NOUN can be any one of the Six Coats nouns. Noun name can be any name unique for that specific noun. Cardinality of context is always one to many be the relationship associative, relative or recursive. A noun has multiple attributes each with a constraint, affordances and ultimately a value.  Note I do not call mechanical access “privileges”.  I prefer “affordances”.

Structured Thinking Language R0.1

Implicity and Explicity

Nothing can be so amusingly arrogant
as a young man who has just discovered an old idea
and thinks it is his own.
Sidney J. Harris

By now I think I have established the legitimacy of the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework and I am presenting it here in what I am going to consider its final form:

zachmanframeworkabstract03.jpg

Every notational technique is a combination of two or more of the Six Coats. What we are working toward ultimately is a language to interrelate all Six Hats and Six Coats at once.

In this post I want to think about the terms “implicit” and “explicit” and how they relate to the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework. For the purpose of this framework implicit is defined as unchanging and invisible; explicit is defined as changing and visible.

Every entity, relationship, attribute, constraint, definition and manipulation has an implicit and explicit name. As well, every motive, locale, object, method, person and event has an implicit and explicit name. An implicit name is unique and once assigned cannot be changed. An explicit name is unique, but it can be changed. The implicit name is not visible to the user. The explicit name is visible to the user.

An entity which contains its own primary key is an implicit entity. An entity which contains a key from another entity in its primary key is an explicit entity.

A relationship that connects one entity’s primary key as part of the attributes of another entity is an implicit relationship. A relationship that connects one entity’s primary key as part of another entity’s primary key is an explicit relationship.

If the primary key is never made visible to the user and cannot be changed it is an implicit primary key. If the primary key is visible and can be changed as long as it is unique it is an explicit primary key.

Attributes that are foreign keys are implicit attributes. Attributes that are non-key are explicit attributes.

Constraints are implicit when they are data listed in a foreign entity. Constraints are explicit when they are a datatype.

Definitions are implicit when they protect explicit child tables. Definitions are explicit when they cascade manipulations.

Implicit manipulations maintain an audit trail. Explicit manipulations do not maintain an audit trail.

So, what is the purpose of implicity and explicity? Primarily it is strength and flexibility. Implicit design results in rigid, but more integral systems. Explicit design results in flexible, but less complete systems. For example, in an office you have work to rule, which is implicit, and work to allow, which is explicit. Ultimately, in dealing with implicity and explicity it is best to strike a balance. No system is fully normalized or fully exceptionalized. It is necessary to allow for both normality and exceptions as no system is fully closed or fully open.

Implicity and Explicity

The Need for a New Language

I have been searching the web looking for modeling standards for each of the Zachman focuses in an effort to explore the feasibility of creating the Structured Thinking Language.

zachmanabstract.jpg

I am finding that my abstract (above) holds more promise to create an integrated modeling language than anything currently out there. The reason for this is the modeling languages I have encountered, all of them, have to at one point or another incorporate more than one focus to be of any value. In other words, the modeling languages are multi-focus views.

The Business Motivation Model by the Business Rules Group is not the solution I foresee as meeting the needs of Business Motivation Modelers. I agree with The Business Rules Manifesto, but I feel the Model is more a generic structure than a suitable modeling language or notation. What it does offer is a common vocabulary for business rule structures. However, rules are the atoms of motivation and the Business Motivation Model does not address that atomicity in a way I see as satisfactory.

We have to create a single language that addresses all six focuses at once. There is not a current language up to the task.

Listening is Inductive; Speaking is Deductive

After going over the system models in an earlier post I had to revise my thinking and conclude that the Structured Thinking Lifecycle takes on the following character:

inducededuce.jpg

What this reveals is the lifecycle of a system is about communication. It also reveals that the Six Hats, Six Coats metaphor is actually a continuum from Repeating Moments to Revising Motives for induction and from Revising Motives to Repeating Moments for deduction.

stl03.jpg

This is Edward de Bono’s wisdom: “Analyze the Past, Design the Future”. That is all there is to communication. Listening is inductive; speaking is deductive.

Think about this from the perspective of the DIKW hierarchy:

dikwinterrogatives.jpg

listening is inductive; speaking is deductive listening is inductive; speaking is deductive listening is inductive; speaking is deductive

STL: Structured Thinking Language (remix)

It’s been a short time coming, but I have hammered out another iteration of the vocabulary for the Structured Thinking Language (STL).

stl03.jpg

REVISE: Conceptualize. Expand Meaning. What are you enhancing or making right? Creativity.

RELATE: Contextualize. Focus on Uniqueness. What is your mantra? Relativity.

REPORT: Logicalize. Maximize Value. What are you normalizing to the limit? Optimicity.

RECORD: Physicalize. Minimize Cost. What is your business model? Pessimicity.

REFINE: Personalize. Humanize Interaction. How do you lower the barriers to adoption? Anthropicity.

REPEAT: Synchronize. Increase Availability. How do you make yourself convenient? Synchronicity.

MOTIVE: Why? Concepts affected.

LOCALE: Where? Contexts affected.

OBJECT: What? Logics affected.

METHOD: How? Physics affected.

PERSON: Who? Humans affected.

MOMENT: When? Synchrons affected.

From here on in there are only six verbs, irregardless of whether you are Inducting (Analyzing) or Deducting (Designing) or (something new) Producting (Developing) or Conducting (Operating). It is the order in which you are performing the verbs which is important.

lifecycle.jpg

I love this. I’m going to invent more words than Shakespeare.

stl structured thinking language remix stl structured thinking language remix stl structured thinking language remix

Induce the Past, Deduce the Future

The title of this post is a variation on a motto of Edward de Bono: “Analyze the Past, Design the Future.” In my work so far on Structured Thinking Language (STL), I have been focusing on the design side of the Equation. This has given us the graphic I have been using regularly:

stl02.jpg

However, while working on hexad reasoning, I produced the following table based on James Moffett’s Universe of Discourse:

moffetthexad02.jpg

If we follow this table from top left row by row to bottom right we are performing analysis of a system. We are reversing the Six Hats, Six Coats design pattern. In this way we can Induce the Past and Deduce the Future using the Structured Thinking Language.

Analytical Verbs:

  1. ATTEND: Accept Scheduling
  2. EMBODY: Follow Affordances
  3. RECORD: Expand Physics
  4. REPORT: Amplify Logic
  5. INDUCE: Generalize
  6. REVISE: Adapt Meaning

Design Verbs:

  1. DEVISE: Adopt Meaning
  2. DEDUCE: Specialize
  3. REFINE: Condense Logic
  4. REDUCE: Contract Physics
  5. INTUIT: Direct Affordances
  6. ENGAGE: Manage Scheduling

I will keep tinkering with the verbs until I am fully satisfied with them.