Tetrad Theories

Here is a table to describe some of the tetrads we have discussed so far in this blog.

tetrad3.jpg

The first column is our friend Structured Query Language (SQL). The second column is the four components of physiological and psychological health. The third column is the tetrad of McLuhan’s Laws of Media. The fourth column are the Zachman Framework’s four perspectives. The fifth column are the first four Structured Development Lifecycle (SDLC) phases.

The rows in the table correlate the similar facets of each of the tetrads. I will go into detail in a later post. How does energy, matter, location and event correlate? How do the Secrets of the Universe of Discourse correlate? How does data, information, knowledge and wisdom correlate? How does colon classification correlate?

Take a moment and let yourself stretch.

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Sanity (revisited)

After a bit of reflection it occurred to me that each of the data manipulation operations reflects each of the four aspects of sanity I discussed earlier. It is almost as if being granted these operations by your mind is being granted your degree of health.

  1. Select
  2. Insert
  3. Update
  4. Delete

If you have select privilege you are able to focus. If you have insert privilege you are allowed flexibility. If you have update privilege you maintain objectivity. If you have delete privilege you are permitting yourself to be resilient.

It should be noted that you not only grant these privileges to yourself. You grant them to other people as well. Then the security cube can become personally relevant defining your simplicity or complexity as a person. The same goes for any system you design.

System Security

John Zachman’s use of the basic interrogatives to define a system lends itself to alternative analysis. One of these cases is system security. When it comes to security there are only four acts you can commit: Select, Insert, Update and Delete. However, you can commit these acts for each of the Zachman Framework Focuses: Data, Network, Motive, Process, People, Time and each of the Zachman Perspectives: Conceptual, Contextual, Logical, Physical, Mechanical, Instantial. What you have as a product is not just a security table, but a security cube. Below is an example of a security table defining 24 possible violations:

systemsecurity.jpg

A security cube would define 4 x 6 x 6 = 264 possible violations. It should be added that violations do not always work in isolation. For example spyware is a procedural insert and data selection. How many cells in the security cube would be affected if a plane crashed into one of your facilities?

It is also important to note that preventing snooping (or sniffing) is often an effective way to prevent the other three manipulation operations.  What they can’t see can’t hurt you.