12 Monkeys

12monkeys

I have been a data designer now for over 25 years.  And after all of that I finally understand what it is I do for a living.  I classify.

There are really only about twelve things you really can do in life.

Let’s mix a little Latin and Anglo-Saxon:

1.  RECREATE – Archics- gowns – astric, stellic and planic
2.  REEQUATE – Scinics – knowns – static, electric and magnetic
3.  RENOVATE – Signics – trends – aeric, atomic and chemic
4.  REGULATE – Engic – trains – terric, mechanic and hydric
5.  REPEAT – Technics – skills – sidic ,desic and curic
6.  RECORD – Clerics – desks – indic, findic and sortic
7.  RESPOND – Servics – serves – sertic, altric and delic
8.  RESTOCK – Prodics – prods – stantic, storic and trievic
9.  RETAIL – Markics – sells – quare, qualic and quantic
10. RESPEND – Pursics – chases – evic, costic and benefic
11. REFUND – Bancs – loans – profic, debic and credic
12. REGENT – Regics – rules – natric, metric and petric

Ultimately we are all stamp collectors.

Framework for a Real Enterprise

It was Peter Drucker who revealed undeniably that business was a science that could lead to predictable results.  The way he did so was by collecting and systematizing all the knowledge he could gather on the subject and then testing hypotheses.  After much deliberation on the science of systems and the science of business.  I present the Physics Framework above and the Enterprise Framework below.  As one physics Nobel laureate said, “If you aren’t doing physics, you’re stamp collecting!”

I am working to refine my framework table for a lay audience. It is a vocabulary for a business system. Like the Linnean system, by using the intersection of the row and column (two terms) I can identify any operation of the system. Still needs work, but its getting there.

It is based on an associative (node and link) architecture not a relational (table and relationships) architecture.

At first glance this might be regarded as a Zachman Framework.  The columns by convention are called focuses.  The rows called perspectives.  The interrogatives make up the column header.  John Zachman offered some poorly chosen row headers which I’ve replaced.  There are two major differences.  First, it requires an additional focus as part of the enterprise, the Market which is measured in potential profit.  It’s time for the academics and bureaucrats to stop turning up their noses to the source of their existence:  a market that will pay in currency to fatten their budgets.  Second, REVISE, the nodes, are something obvious to Einstein; RELATE, the links, something obvious to Drucker (remember the links are verbs); REPORT, the node and link attributes, should be obvious to Thomas Jefferson; RECORD, the databases, to Carnegie; REGARD, the datatypes, to Turing; REPOSE, the ordinality, which remembers whats related to what, REVEAL, the cardinality, full of exceptions to the enterprise.

Systema: Geodesates as Singularities

“No one untrained in geometry may enter my house” — Plato

Over the past year I have been working with associative and relational databases attempting to find out more about how to develop a better database architecture.  This has taken me into many realms including network theory, chaos theory, state transition theory, geometry, logic, chemistry, biochemistry and physics.  Recently, I began to put these things together and I think I have had a valuable insight.  I call this insight “Geodesate Singularities”.

Geodesate Singularities regard networks as transitions between geodesates which are a group of convex polyhedrons.  Convex polyhedron networks have vertexes as nodes and edges as links.

What is of primary importance to this concept is the vertex enumeration (number of vertexes) and the polytope (number of edges per vertice) in these convex polyhedrons as geodesates are regarded as the most stable states.

First frequency Geodesates are a subset of the Platonic Solids and the Archimedean Solids:

  1. 3 edges per 4 vertices – 6 edges  – Tetrahedron
  2. 4 edges per 6 vertices – 12 edges  – Octahedron
  3. 3 edges per 12 vertices – 18 edges – Truncated Tetrahedron
  4. 5 edges per 12 vertices  – 30 edges – Icosahedron
  5. 3 edges per 20 vertices  – 30 edges – Dodecahedron
  6. 3 edges per 24 vertices – 36 edges – Truncated Cube
  7. 4 edges per 30 vertices – 60 edges – Icosadodecahedron
  8. 3 edges per 60 vertices – 90 edges – Truncated Icosahedron
  9. 3 edges per 60 vertices – 90 edges – Truncated Dodecahedron
  10. 5 edges per 60 vertices – 150 edges – Snub Dodecahedron
  11. 3 edges per 120 vertices – 180 edges – Great Rhombicosidodecahedron

Higher frequency Geodesates are triagulations of the above solids.  I recommend downloading the Mathematica Player and the Mathematica Demonstrations Project Geodesate Demonstration to view the polygons for each frequency.

Again, what is important in the Geodesates are the number of vertexes (nodes) and edges (links).

My hypothesis is when the growth of a network achieves the vertex enumeration and polytope of a geodesate at the first frequency or higher, a singularity state exists in the network order and results in a state transition of the network when exceeded.

Increasing a Geodesate’s frequency involves dividing the faces of the chosen polygon into sub-triangles:

The first frequecy subdivision is termed as 1V, second as 2V, third as 3V and fourth as 4V.

1V Icosahedron Geodesate

12 Vertexes – 12 5 Edge Polytopes

2V Icosahedron Geodesate

42 Vertexes – 12 5 Edge Polytopes – 30 6 Edge Polytopes

3V Icosahedron Geodesate

92 Vertexes – 12 5 Edge Polytopes – 80 6 Edge Polytopes

4V Icosahedron Geodesate

162 Vertexes – 12 5 Edge Polytopes – 150 6 Edge Polytopes

I think geodesate singularites have  implications for Telic, Organic, Chemic, Physic, Static and Gegonic networks.  This has implications for Ray Kurzweil’s Singularities, Malcolm Gladwell’s Tipping Points, Stuart Kauffman’s Self-Organization and Howard Rheingold’s Cooperation Theory.

Convex polyhedrons and geodesates could create and limit new organizational structures for enterprise goals, personnel, products, measures, spaces and schedules.

Related Links:

Icons: The Czerepak Framework

Beyond the Singularity

Physics: Observer as a State

Sociology: The Six Adopter Types

Icons: The Czerepak Framework

Tearing apart the Zachman Framework has yielded great results.  I have identified the core nodes and links (we won’t use the terms entities and associations any more).  The new Nodes of the Czerepak Framework are:

  1. Computers
  2. Machines
  3. Goals
  4. Observers
  5. Elements
  6. Particles
  7. Points
  8. Events

The new Links are:

  1. Operations
  2. Processes
  3. Rules
  4. Names
  5. Bonds
  6. Quanta
  7. Distances
  8. Durations

If you look at the link icons you can see what I am hypothesizing as the optimum cardinality for each.  I am thinking about this from the perspective of the Platonic solids, R. Buckminster Fuller’s work, Stuart Koffman’s work with chaos theory and Boolean networks and Albert Einstein’s own love for geometry.

The set of icons created to this point are below:

Systema: MixThirtySix – New Greek, New Icons, New Colors

After pulling out a Latin and Greek dictionary during a phone call to my professional writer sister, I came to realize that John Zachman served us a horrible brutalization of Greek for terminology. Had he only looked at the Greek language with some insight he would have saved me considerable difficulty in correlating definition with application.

Johnny ‘s been messin’ wid our ‘eads, man.

Correcting that usage will be on my to do list.

Here, I am abstracting the framework by incorporating the correct Greek, abstracting the focuses by using polygon icons and abstracting the perspectives by using de Bono’s thinking color code:

There you have it, a completely new take on the Mix Thirty-six.

Hey, Aristotle, Six Unities! Hey, Plato, Six Polygons! Hey, de Bono, Six Hats!

Yes, after a day’s head banging, I switched when and where.

In the next post, I will be definining each of these icons. Now we can talk about System Logics, System Organics, System Mechanics, System Physics, System Cosmics and System Chronics with a sense that our terminology will migrate across disciplines easily if our audience has any understanding of Greek roots.

Systema: The Six Relationships

For years I have been thinking that there are only four relationships in data modeling:

  1. Many to Many
  2. One to Many
  3. One to One
  4. Recursive

At least that’s what the books seemed to say. However I have been reconsidering since I began exploring the Zachman Framework on my own. It has become apparent to me through many practical applications that the textbooks are not always right. Below are the six basic data modeling relationships:

As you can see there are three cursive and three recursive relationships. The cursive relationships are between two separate entities. The recursive relationships are between an entity and itself. Restating them, they are:

  1. Cursive Many to Many
  2. Cursive One to Many
  3. Cursive One to One
  4. Recursive Many to Many
  5. Recursive One to Many
  6. Recursive One to One

Many to many relationships are resolved as illustrated below:

How does this fit into the Zachman Framework? Let’s examine the framework as I illustrate it below:

As you can see relationships each serve a purpose. Concepts are associations between intstances of differing entities. Contexts are one to many relationships between instances of differing entities. Logics are one to one relationships between instances of differing entities. Physics are associations between instances of the same entity. Spherics are one to many relationships between instances of the same entity. Episodics are one to one relationships between instances of the same entity.

Another way to consider this diagram is the first three relationships involve attributes, while the second three relationships involve domains.