Mood Disorders: Solution States

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In my philanthropic work with persons with mood disorders I have come to see a structure to mood.  Mood is affected by how we react to the stress of a problem and this puts us into a solution state.  People have a range of mood states that extend from the suicidal (nullity), stable (singularity) and psychotic (plurality).  Stress pushes us either upward or downward from a singular state.  This is not a linear transition, but an exponential Lorentz transformation that ultimately forms a bell curve (if you give this diagram another half).  Consequently, you have unipolar and bipolar individuals who experience a wider range of moods than the majority.

I have been doing considerable research and experiment regarding psychiatric classifications over the past three years.  In particular, bipolar affective disorder an unipolar affective disorder and have reached the following conclusions:

  • psychiatric states are dependent upon how an individual reacts to stress when encountering a problem
  • a non-polar individual encounters multiple solutions (stable), which I call singularity
  • a unipolar individual encounters zero solutions (suicide), which I call nullity, or one solution (stable), which I call singularity
  • a bipolar individual encounters either zero solutions (suicide), which I call nullity, one solution (stable), which I call a singularity, or infinite solutions (mania), which I call a plurality

Both unipolar and bipolar individuals enter nullity states, singularity states  and plurality states due to avoidance of a Maslovian need, a complex.

Neither medication, hospitalization, incarceration nor electrocution (ECT) are the solutions to a complex.

Solving a complex and consequently the nullity, singularity or plurality requires concerted peer support, exercise, nutrition and sleep at state onset until the complex is confronted by the individual and resolved.  Upon resolution, a normal emotional range is restored.

If you read the work of Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D. you will discover the “spirituality” you seek, the “good” you seek, is in the right hemisphere of your brain. The left hemisphere of your brain is discrete processing. The right hemisphere of your brain is concrete processing.

In fact, in my work with people with mental health problems (the word “issues” is bullshit) I find that unipolar (depression) and bipolar (manic-depressive) people appear to be either severely left brain dominant in the case of unipolarity or alternating between left and right brain dominance in the case of bipolarity. There is no physical or chemical evidence of any difference between a “stable” person, a unipolar person and a bipolar person. Stress simply pushes mental dominance to the right or left hemisphere.

Tim Brown: Creativity and Play

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Do you want to be creative?

  1. Forget the opinions of your peers
  2. Provide a trusting environment conducive to play
  3. Turn off your Internal Editors
  4. Go for quantity
  5. Explore and Experiment
  6. Build Prototypes–Think with your hands
  7. Role Play–Insight to experience
  8. Play is not anarchy–it has cooperative rules
  9. Alternate between Divergent and Convergent modes

Related:

Tim Brown, Design Thinking Blog

Tim Brown, “Strategy by Design”, Fast Company

Tim Brown, “How I Work”, Fortune

IDEO website

Tim Brown, “Innovation Through Design Thinking”, MIT World Video