Systema: Some Basics

Chris Collins has written a good Introduction to the Zachman Framework that I recommend with a caution: I do not accept that John Zachman fully understands what he is talking about. What this means to me is I will be gradually divorcing myself from using the term Zachman Framework and use the term “Systema” instead. He himself acknowledges that he borrowed his concept from the six interrogatives and construction terminology and from all I’ve read I do not feel that John ever fully explored what he used indepth.

If he had he would have realized there is only one true dimension which are the six unities, which I borrow modified from Aristotle. Every new dimension is simply a repeat of the six unities.

My terminology continues to evolve:

  1. Causus: Problem – The Mavin – provides niche – possibility
  2. Cognitus: Hypothesis – The Connector – provides associations – compatibility
  3. Artus: Method – The Salesman – provides purchase rationale – reliability
  4. Datus: Apparatus – The Accountant – provides mass market – economy
  5. Eventus: Result – The Secretary – provides delivery schedule – accessibility
  6. Locus: Location – The Receptionist – provides product touchpoints – geography

This brings to mind The Innovator’s Dilemma and shows that the tipping point is between reliability and economy.

He would have also pointed out that there are only four fundamental verbs that can be performed on the six factors. I am still refining the icon design.

Systema: Art and Method

I have been spending considerable time in the University of Notre Dame Latin English Dictionary this past week looking to refine my terminology for Systema. One of my discoveries is that “modus” is not a term for “method”, but “standard” such as “modus operandi” — “standard operation”. The actual word for method or skill is “ars” or “art”. Thus “Art of War”–Artis Armus–is synonymous to “Method of War” or “Skill of War”. Consequently, I will be referring to the How interrogative with the response as “Artus” not “Modus”. The six interrogatives and responses are as follows:

  1. Why – Causus – Cause
  2. Who – Ductus – Command
  3. How – Artus – Method
  4. What – Datus – Given
  5. When – Eventus – Result
  6. Where – Locus – Location

Interestingly enough, this fits very well into the Empirical Process. All that is left out is the conclusion. The conclusion determines “how much” the system corroborates (benefits) the cause.

7. How Much – Conclusus – Conclusion

Structured Thinking System: Attributes and Constraints

A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds.
Sir Francis Bacon

One of my regular readers has asked me to put Lao-Tzu aside and tighten up my language. Since he is a Director of Emergency Management for a metropolitian area, I can understand his requirement for clarity and brevity. So I will put away my gong and see what I can do regarding what he says. He also asked me if I intend to use this concept and I want to make it clear that I will be the first to use it and I will use it until it works smoothly before putting anyone else at risk.

Another question that has come up is my continual tinkering with the terminology. I am doing so because the semantics are crucial to understanding this concept. I have found so far that wrestling with the terms reveals new layers of the concept I hadn’t seen before. For example, I have to distinguish between induction and deduction using a consistent terminology. This is not always obvious at first and requires several interations of refinement. I also wish to create a set of terms that are easy to remember. For example, I have been attempting to find a six letter word that starts with “RE” and means “trust”. Quite accidentally I came upon the term “REPOSE” and will be incorporating it into the vocabulary.

Anyone who has been following the full thread of this blog has probably discovered one of the underlying conclusions I have reached regarding the variety of Hexads I have created and explored. That conclusion is that the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework is a Cartesian Square. I also believe that the Structured Thinking System Entities are a Cartesian square. And now I am faced with the challenge of using the verb REPORT to create the attributes for the thirty-six Structured Thinking System entities.

Here is the latest version of the Structured Thinking System Entities:

sts-entities-01.jpg

I have already concluded the REPORT verb works with only six attributes:

  1. Motive
  2. Person
  3. Method
  4. Object
  5. Locale
  6. Moment

The RECORD verb is constrained to only six values per attribute:

  1. Motive: Reality, Unity, Quality, Quantity, Safety, Remedy
  2. Person: Creator, Leader, Master, Novice, Guide, Contact
  3. Method: Revise, Relate, Report, Record, Repose, Replace
  4. Object: Motive, Person, Method, Object, Locale, Moment
  5. Locale: Universal, Global, Official, Collegial, Habitual, Physical
  6. Moment: Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second

One of each of these attribute values are captured by the RECORD verb to define a Structured Thinking System entity’s state. The Structured Thinking System relationships define which of the states can be assigned according to the hierarchy.

Related Posts:

Systema: Seven Hats, Seven Links

Structured Thinking System: Objects

Be Content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.
Lao Tzu

sts-entities.jpg

  1. MOTIVE refers to rules. Moral Law content.
  2. PERSON refers to people. Command content.
  3. OBJECT refers to data. Discipline content.
  4. METHOD refers to function. Training content.
  5. LOCALE refers to node. Terrain content.
  6. MOMENT refers to event. Climate content.

Related Links:

STL: Shakedown R0.4

structured-thinking

I believe we are on an irreversible trend toward more freedom and democracy
– but that could change.
Dan Quayle

I’ve been playing with writing STL code for a couple of days now and have been working out some major logical issues. Actually trying to write code instead of syntax that is logical has shaken down the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework considerably. Sort of like dismantling and rebuilding a Chevy and then taking it on its first drive through the neighborhood without a muffler.

One of the things I have discovered is that Structured Thinking Language is best for describing Structured Thinking Systems (The Six Hats, Six Coats Framework). So let’s take a look at what I found.

First, we will go over the revised verbs and nouns. Here are the Structured Thinking Verbs:

stl-verbs.jpg

  1. CREATE refers to the extistential. Capability. Right a wrong.
  2. RELATE refers to the unity. Portability. Have a mantra.
  3. REPORT refers to the benefit. Reliability. Unique and valuable.
  4. RECORD refers to the cost. Profitability. Have a business plan.
  5. AFFORD refers to the usability. Security. Easy to adopt.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the convenience. Availability. Spawn evangelists.

And Here are the Structured Thinking Nouns:

stl-nouns.jpg

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rule hierarchy. Moral Law.
  2. PERSON refers to the people hierarchy. Command.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data hierarchy. Discipline.
  4. METHOD refers to the function hierarchy. Training.
  5. LOCALE refers to to the node hierarchy. Terrain.
  6. MOMENT refers to the event hierarchy. Climate.

This gives us our Structured Thinking Framework:

structuredthinking02.jpg

What we have as a result is the meshing of six horizontal hierarchies and six vertical hierarchies.

Next, we create all of the entities. There are six entities per noun.

CREATE	CreateName
	MOTIVE	(	Virtue,
			Unity,
 			Esteem,
 			Accord,
 			Safety,
 			Entity
 		) 

 	PERSON	(	Creator,
			Leader,
			Patron,
			Member,
			Friend,
			Teller
 		) 

 	OBJECT	(	Motive,
 			Person,
 			Object,
 			Method,
 			Locale,
 			Moment
 		) 

 	METHOD	(	Create,
 			Relate,
 			Report,
 			Record,
 			Afford,
 			Engage
 		) 

 	LOCALE	(	ExtraNet,
 			InterNet,
 			IntraNet,
 			ExtraNode,
 			InterNode,
 			IntraNode
 		)
 	MOMENT	(	Year,
 			Month,
 			Day,
 			Hour,
 			Minute,
 			Second
 		);

Next we relate the entities to one another. The keys are surrogates, so they are not visible. I am building a set of relationships from left to right on each row and a set of relationships top to bottom on each column:

RELATE 	RelationshipName
 	(	MOTIVE.Virtue 	TO MOTIVE.Unity,
		MOTIVE.Unity	TO MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Esteem 	TO MOTIVE.Accord,
 		MOTIVE.Accord 	TO MOTIVE.Safety,
 		MOTIVE.Safety 	TO MOTIVE.Entity
		MOTIVE.Mantra 	TO PERSON.Creator,
 		PERSON.Creator  TO OBJECT.Motive,
 		OBJECT.Motive 	TO METHOD.Create,
 		METHOD.Create 	TO LOCALE.ExtraNet,
 		LOCALE.ExtraNet	TO MOMENT.Year
 		PERSON.Creator 	TO PERSON.Leader,
 		PERSON.Leader 	TO PERSON.Patron,
 		PERSON.Patron 	TO PERSON.Member,
 		PERSON.Member 	TO PERSON.Friend,
 		PERSON.Friend 	TO PERSON.Teller,
		MOTIVE.Unity 	TO PERSON.Leader,
 		PERSON.Leader	TO OBJECT.Person,
 		OBJECT.Person	TO METHOD.Relate,
 		METHOD.Relate	TO LOCALE.InterNet,
		...
 	);

This gives us the following entities composing our Structured Thinking System (STS):

stl-entities-03.jpg

As you can see, the order of the columns have been changed. You can also see that I have changed the color coding of the hats and coats to better reflect common usage in the industry (ie. Black Hat = Secure). I also think I am coming more into line with de Bono, but the jury is still out on that one.

Another issue raised in making the relationships is they are one to many as they proceed left to right across the rows and one to many as they proceed down the columns. There is no compromise to this if the system is to work at peak effectiveness.

There is no need for normalization or denormalization as the structure is fully normalized. There is also no need for attributes because they are identical for every entity:

  • Motive
  • Person
  • Object
  • Method
  • Locale
  • Moment

I am at a turning point here. I have to go deeper into the model to determine how to create attributes. Which I have not yet attempted. I have to save it for later posts.

Now we can create our reports. This is an alternate function of the six verbs that occurred to me. Note that the selected cells are all adjacent to one another either horizontally or vertically and flow from left to right; top to bottom:

REPORT	ReportName
 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Accord,
 		PERSON.Member,
 		OBJECT.Method,
 		METHOD.Record,
 		METHOD.Afford,
 		LOCALE.IntraNode,
 		MOMENT.Minute
 	);

Giving us the following Report:

If you want to throw in some filters it is easy:

REPORT	ReportName 

 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Accord,
 		PERSON.Member = John Doe,
 		OBJECT.Method,
 		METHOD.Record,
 		METHOD.Afford,
 		LOCALE.IntraNode,
 		MOMENT.Minute = 30 	);

The “30” aggregates to every 30 minutes.

Now we can plan our data capture. Again an alternate use for the RECORD verb. Again the cells for capture are all adjacent to the left or down:

RECORD	RecordName
 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		PERSON.Patron,
 		PERSON.Member,
 		OBJECT.Method
 );

This would create the following form:

Here we set up the affordances for the entities:

AFFORD	AffordName
 		RECORD.RecordName
	TO 	PERSON.Member;

Finally, we execute the RECORD Script and as the Member isn’t given the Member must log in:

ENGAGE	EngageName
 	(	RECORD.RecordName
	AND	PERSON.Member
	);

The code I have created here is a radical departure from the syntax releases I have come out with so far as I realized what the design was leading me to create. And that is the clincher. The design brought itself out. I have just been trying to follow it along.

What I am finding is there are not four verbs–Select, Insert, Update, Delete–but six–create, relate, report, record, afford and engage!

Related Posts:

Systema: Seven Hats, Seven Links

STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.3

I had a bit of an epiphany today. What I realized is that by structuring Structured Thinking Language as I have, everything can evolve as lists. Each VERB is simply the addition of another list to the NOUN you are working with.

Six Verbs: CREATE, RELATE, REPORT, RECORD, AFFORD, ENGAGE

Six Nouns: MOTIVE, LOCALE, OBJECT, METHOD, PERSON, MOMENT

Four Adjectives: INDUCED, DEDUCED and IMPLICIT, EXPLICIT

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN
        (   nounname_1,
            ...,
            nounname_n
        );       

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname TO
                (    NOUN_1.nounname_1,
                     ...,
                     NOUN_n.nounname_n
                );         

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
                (    attributename_1,
                     ...,
                     attributename_n
                );       

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename
                (    constraintname_1,
                     ...,
                     constraintname_n
                );         

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
                (    SELECT
                     INSERT,
                     UPDATE,
                     DELETE
                )
                ON
                (   NOUN_1.nounname_1,
                    ...,
                    NOUN_n.nounname_n
                );         

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE

Obviously, it still needs work, but we can see where the Structured Thinking Language adds value to the design process. SQL does have it’s place in data manipulation. However, STL has a place in data definition. See the related posts for background information on this syntax.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.3

STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.2

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

I find I hated the Six Hats being six adjectives in STL R0.1 so I am changing them back to verbs:

  1. CREATE refers to the creation of entities. Meaning. Capability.
  2. RELATE refers to the creation of relationships. Uniqueness. Portability.
  3. REPORT refers to the creation of attributes. Value. Reliability.
  4. RECORD refers to the creation of constraints. Business Plan. Profitability.
  5. AFFORD refers to the creation of affordances. Adoption. Usability.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the creation of manipulations. Evangelism. Availability.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r02_1.jpg

INDUCE and DEDUCE will be changed to the adjectives INDUCED and DEDUCED.

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on Release 0.2 of the syntax:

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname;

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                ); 

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename; 

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname; 

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
 	(	SELECT,
 		INSERT,
 		UPDATE,
 		DELETE
 	); 

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

That’s it for now. Time to get some sleep.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.2