Systema: CI-DIKW Hierarchy Definitions

I have been wanting to clearly define each of the terms Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom for some time. I have thought about Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Bases, Knowledge Management, Data Management and other disciplines and have decided on the following simple definitions:

  1. Wisdom is the ability to model entities in a system. This is extrapolative.
  2. Knowledge is the ability to model relationships in a system. This is interpolative.
  3. Information is the ability to model attributes in a system. This is intrapolative.
  4. Data is the ability to model constraints in a system. This is extrapolitive.
  5. Intuition is the ability to model definitions in a system. This is interpolitive.
  6. Communication is the ability to model manipulations to and from a system. This is intrapolitive.

I have been forced to come up with the root “polite” to describe a single input value as opposed to “polar” which is a collection of input values. But what I want to point out is there is no automated tool capable of creating new models of communication, intuition, data, information, knowledge or wisdom, as simply defined as this is, that can be regarded as “intelligent.”
The above six perspectives affect the following focuses or modeling languages:

  1. Motivation Modeling
  2. Network Modeling
  3. Data Modeling
  4. Process Modeling
  5. Person Modeling
  6. Time Modeling

The perspectives CIDIKW and focuses MNDPPT make a thirty-six cell framework I call the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework. What I am pointing out here is that no system is simply one dimensional. Human systems are six dimensional at least. There is also a meta-layer, the model, and a data-layer, the database, for each dimension. The modeling systems and databases for all the dimensions are still very primitive and incompatible. Slowly, we are getting there, but there is more than enough work out there for anyone who wants to come up with a consistent modeling language. And if you do, you will have the foundation for a true AI.

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Six Hats, Six Coats and Sun Tzu

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From Sun Tzu on the The Art of War

I. LAYING PLANS

1. Sun Tzu said: The art of war is of vital importance to the State.

2. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.

3. The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one’s deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

4. These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth; (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.

5,6. The Moral Law causes the people to be in complete accord with their ruler, so that they will follow him regardless of their lives, undismayed by any danger.

7. Heaven signifies night and day, cold and heat, times and seasons.

8. Earth comprises distances, great and small; danger and security; open ground and narrow passes; the chances of life and death.

9. The Commander stands for the virtues of wisdom, sincerely, benevolence, courage and strictness.

10. By method and discipline are to be understood the marshaling of the army in its proper subdivisions, the graduations of rank among the officers, the maintenance of roads by which supplies may reach the army, and the control of military expenditure.

11. These five heads should be familiar to every general: he who knows them will be victorious; he who knows them
not will fail.

12. Therefore, in your deliberations, when seeking to determine the military conditions, let them be made the basis of a comparison, in this wise:–

13. (1) Which of the two sovereigns is imbued with the Moral law?
(2) Which of the two generals has most ability?
(3) With whom lie the advantages derived from Heaven and Earth?
(4) On which side is discipline most rigorously enforced?
(5) Which army is stronger?
(6) On which side are officers and men more highly trained?
(7) In which army is there the greater constancy both in reward and punishment?

14. By means of these seven considerations I can forecast victory or defeat.

15. The general that hearkens to my counsel and acts upon it, will conquer: let such a one be retained in command! The general that hearkens not to my counsel nor acts upon it, will suffer defeat:–let such a one be dismissed!

16. While heading the profit of my counsel, avail yourself also of any helpful circumstances over and beyond the ordinary rules.

17. According as circumstances are favorable, one should modify one’s plans.

18. All warfare is based on deception.

19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

20. Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him.

21. If he is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strength, evade him.

22. If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.

23. If he is taking his ease, give him no rest. If his forces are united, separate them.

24. Attack him where he is unprepared, appear where you are not expected.

25. These military devices, leading to victory, must not be divulged beforehand.

26. Now the general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple ere the battle is fought. The general who loses a battle makes but few calculations beforehand. Thus do many calculations lead to victory, and few calculations to defeat: how much more no calculation at all! It is by attention to this point that I can foresee who is likely to win or lose.

Sun Tzu truly was one of the greatest minds in human history. He knew that a war was a collision between two systems. He had a firm grasp of the military as a system and had reduced it to its fundamental components.

  1. MOTIVE: Moral Law. Vision and Mission.
  2. LOCALE: Earth. Terrain.
  3. OBJECT: Discipline. Integrity.
  4. METHOD: Method. Training.
  5. PERSON: Commander. Organization.
  6. MOMENT: Heaven. Climate.

The correlation between the Six Coats and the Five Fundamental Factors is complete. Let’s take a look at Sun Tzu using the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework:

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A nice fit.

Six Hats, Six Coats and Sun Tzu

The Need for a New Language

I have been searching the web looking for modeling standards for each of the Zachman focuses in an effort to explore the feasibility of creating the Structured Thinking Language.

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I am finding that my abstract (above) holds more promise to create an integrated modeling language than anything currently out there. The reason for this is the modeling languages I have encountered, all of them, have to at one point or another incorporate more than one focus to be of any value. In other words, the modeling languages are multi-focus views.

The Business Motivation Model by the Business Rules Group is not the solution I foresee as meeting the needs of Business Motivation Modelers. I agree with The Business Rules Manifesto, but I feel the Model is more a generic structure than a suitable modeling language or notation. What it does offer is a common vocabulary for business rule structures. However, rules are the atoms of motivation and the Business Motivation Model does not address that atomicity in a way I see as satisfactory.

We have to create a single language that addresses all six focuses at once. There is not a current language up to the task.

Untangling Planar Graphs

Planarity is an excellent excercise for data modelers attempting to untangle their entity relationship diagrams.  Move up the levels and hone your skills.

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What Do the Boxes and Lines Mean?

For the past several posts I have been listing tetrads in juxtaposition to a set of graphics:

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These four graphics are representative of the four fundamental relationships in the relational model using a notational style called IDEF1X.  These four relationships are used to design relational databases.  I am of the opinion that these relationships form what I call a “tetrad”, a term I borrow from Marshall McLuhan, and that it shares characteristics with other tetrads.

I invite you to look at the other posts under the tetrad category in my blog.

Intelligence is not Behaviour but Prediction

Came across a video of Jeff Hawkins of the Redwood Neuroscience Institute explaining brain theory.

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Remember, the above diagram as you view the video. Also think about the Universe of Discourse as explained by James Moffett. The theory has already been hinted at.

Tetrad Theories (continued)

In my previous post I gave some examples of tetrad theories. Here are some more:

tetradtwo4.jpg

The first column is SQL again, just to give us our bearings. The second column is based on graphing terminology. The third column is based on a book Innovator’s Dilemma. The fourth column deals with the basic relationships and cardinality of data modeling. The fifth column with the basic facets of physics.

Again, the rows correlate.