STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.2

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

I find I hated the Six Hats being six adjectives in STL R0.1 so I am changing them back to verbs:

  1. CREATE refers to the creation of entities. Meaning. Capability.
  2. RELATE refers to the creation of relationships. Uniqueness. Portability.
  3. REPORT refers to the creation of attributes. Value. Reliability.
  4. RECORD refers to the creation of constraints. Business Plan. Profitability.
  5. AFFORD refers to the creation of affordances. Adoption. Usability.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the creation of manipulations. Evangelism. Availability.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r02_1.jpg

INDUCE and DEDUCE will be changed to the adjectives INDUCED and DEDUCED.

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on Release 0.2 of the syntax:

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname;

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                ); 

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename; 

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname; 

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
 	(	SELECT,
 		INSERT,
 		UPDATE,
 		DELETE
 	); 

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

That’s it for now. Time to get some sleep.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.2

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Induce the Past, Deduce the Future (continued)

Inductive (Analysis) Pattern:

stlinduction.jpg

Deductive (Design) Pattern:

stldeduction.jpg

This assumes a top left, row by row, to bottom right path. As you can see, induction (analysis) instead of being relegated to a single phase is a methodology in its own right.  Also it should be recognized that Induction is a bottom up process, while Deduction is top down.

STL: The INTUIT Verb

stl02.jpg

Since I created the Six Hats, Six Coats metaphor I have made several modifications to the language used. It has lead me to come up with what I call the Structured Thinking Language (STL). I am working on the syntax and will discuss this in later posts. The one term I want to draw attention to in this post is in the left column, the new verb “INTUIT”.

I have chosen the verb “INTUIT” first, because of Edward de Bono’s inspiring six thinking hats, second because I do not like the verb “develop”. To intuit is in part to provide the materials and know how to build the system based on the result of the REDUCE statement. The other part is consideration of the origins, physical and cultural development, biological characteristics, social customs and beliefs of the users to create affordances. The use of the term “affordance” is much broader than and includes Donald A. Norman’s usage in The Design of Everyday Things. In STL an “affordance” is synonymous to the Zachman Framework’s “focus”. A complete system is composed of motivational, spatial, formal, functional, personal and temporal affordances which are complete intuitively designed subsystems including the appropriate intuitive cues. I want to use a word that implies not only developing, but developing with the REDUCE result and the intuition of persons who interact with the system as primary considerations.