Structured Thinking System: Motives

At the center of your being you have the answer;
you know who you are and you know what you want.
Lao Tzu

Out of my work on the Structured Thinking Language I have come to the realization that it is best suited to describe systems based upon its own core principles. Sort of a “it’s turtles all the way down” recursion.

sts-entities.jpg

I will systematically go through them and discuss their characteristics starting with Green Coat: Motives.

The MOTIVE column: Verity, Unity, Quality, Quantity, Safety, Entity.

The MOTIVE column is based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Originally, I thought that the hierarchy required an additional level at the bottom to deal with interoceptive and exteroceptive perception, but as I worked with several other hexads I came to conclude that instead, as Maslow came to conclude, it required another level at the top. Maslow called this top level trascendence, but in the context of the other hexads I decided to call it Verity. Verity is defined as “1. the state or quality of being true; accordance with fact or reality and 2. something that is true, as a principle, belief, idea, or statement.” Personally, I consider it as “the desire to right what is wrong.” The next motive is Unity which is defined as “containing all the elements properly belonging”. Maslow uses the fancy term “self-actualization”, but I think a self-actualized person can simply be called an unified person. The third motive is Quality which is defined as “uniqueness and value”. The fourth motive is Quantity “low cost participation”. The fifth motive is Safety which can be defined “freedom from the occurrence or risk of injury, danger, or loss”. The sixth motive is Entity which I define as “existing or being”. One Verity has many Unities; one Unity has many Qualities; one Quality has many Quantities, one Quantity has many Safeties; one Safety has many Relieves and, here’s the clincher, One Relief has many Verities.

In Summary:

  1. Verity is to achieve Moral Law.
  2. Unity is to achieve Command.
  3. Quality is to achieve Discipline.
  4. Quantity is to achieve Training.
  5. Safety is to achieve Terrain.
  6. Relief is to achieve Climate.

Related Links:

What’s Right with the Zachman Framework

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Lao-tzu, The Way of Lao-tzu
Chinese philosopher (604 BC – 531 BC)

I just finished reading Graeme Simsion’s article What’s Wrong With The Zachman Framework? and found his opinions to be quite shallow.  His opinions show a limited exposure to the basic interrogatives–only as John Zachman has portrayed them–and a lack of knowledge that every modeling language uses combinations of the interrogatives to convey meaning.  The interrogatives are rarely dealt with individually and even Zachman makes this mistake in his examples regarding the focuses.

First, Simsion attacks the limitation of six perspectives.  He advocates adding a volume and cost perspective to the interrogatives.  He doesn’t realize that volume and value are irrelevant because the six interrogatives are scalable.  Second, the architecture metaphor is challenged.  Simsion never abstracted Zachman’s model.  If he had he would realize that the architectural metaphor conceals what the six perspectives are actually about:  Entities, Relationships, Attributes, Constraints, Definitions and Manipulations.  Third, Simsion claims there is no evidence of the plausibility of the Zachman Framework.  He fails to recognize that every modeling system is using the interrogatives to only partial effect and deriving significant benefits in quantity and quality of product.  There at this time is no product that integrates all of the interrogatives in the Zachman Framework.  Simsion also criticizes the framework for his inability to incorporate object oriented projects into it.  The reason for this is because he doesn’t realize that objects must be treated as attributes not as entities as laid down by Chris Date in his Third Manifesto.

zachmanframeworkabstract03.jpg

The truth is the interrogatives have a foundation that goes back over three thousand years across every human culture.  A human system has six scalable characteristics:  Who, What, When, Where, How and Why.  A non-human system has four scalable characteristics:  What, When, Where and How.  I don’t recall anyone asking Einstein about Volume or Cost when he wrote E=mc².

Simsion’s article is a tribute to ignorance.  John Zachman’s interpretation only scratches the surface.

Systema: Chuck Hoberman and Lisa Randall

I have found a wonderful discussion of modeling between Chuck Hoberman and Lisa Randall in Seed Magazine.

Chuck Hoberman is the designer, architect, artist, and engineer best known for inventing the Hoberman Sphere, a geodesic globe that can expand up to five times its diameter. He won the Chrysler Design Award in 1997, and his creations have been displayed around the world. Harvard physicist Lisa Randall is renowned for her work on extra dimensions, and in 2004, she was the most cited theoretical physicist of the previous five years. This year, Randall was included in the Time 100, Time‘s list of the most influential people in the world. Hoberman’s unique use of shape, scale, and dimension in his transformable designs seemed richly analogous with Randall’s use of extra dimensions and warped geometry in her research on the nature of the universe. Seed invited them to explore this conceptually common ground.

STL: Shakedown R0.4

structured-thinking

I believe we are on an irreversible trend toward more freedom and democracy
– but that could change.
Dan Quayle

I’ve been playing with writing STL code for a couple of days now and have been working out some major logical issues. Actually trying to write code instead of syntax that is logical has shaken down the Six Hats, Six Coats Framework considerably. Sort of like dismantling and rebuilding a Chevy and then taking it on its first drive through the neighborhood without a muffler.

One of the things I have discovered is that Structured Thinking Language is best for describing Structured Thinking Systems (The Six Hats, Six Coats Framework). So let’s take a look at what I found.

First, we will go over the revised verbs and nouns. Here are the Structured Thinking Verbs:

stl-verbs.jpg

  1. CREATE refers to the extistential. Capability. Right a wrong.
  2. RELATE refers to the unity. Portability. Have a mantra.
  3. REPORT refers to the benefit. Reliability. Unique and valuable.
  4. RECORD refers to the cost. Profitability. Have a business plan.
  5. AFFORD refers to the usability. Security. Easy to adopt.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the convenience. Availability. Spawn evangelists.

And Here are the Structured Thinking Nouns:

stl-nouns.jpg

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rule hierarchy. Moral Law.
  2. PERSON refers to the people hierarchy. Command.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data hierarchy. Discipline.
  4. METHOD refers to the function hierarchy. Training.
  5. LOCALE refers to to the node hierarchy. Terrain.
  6. MOMENT refers to the event hierarchy. Climate.

This gives us our Structured Thinking Framework:

structuredthinking02.jpg

What we have as a result is the meshing of six horizontal hierarchies and six vertical hierarchies.

Next, we create all of the entities. There are six entities per noun.

CREATE	CreateName
	MOTIVE	(	Virtue,
			Unity,
 			Esteem,
 			Accord,
 			Safety,
 			Entity
 		) 

 	PERSON	(	Creator,
			Leader,
			Patron,
			Member,
			Friend,
			Teller
 		) 

 	OBJECT	(	Motive,
 			Person,
 			Object,
 			Method,
 			Locale,
 			Moment
 		) 

 	METHOD	(	Create,
 			Relate,
 			Report,
 			Record,
 			Afford,
 			Engage
 		) 

 	LOCALE	(	ExtraNet,
 			InterNet,
 			IntraNet,
 			ExtraNode,
 			InterNode,
 			IntraNode
 		)
 	MOMENT	(	Year,
 			Month,
 			Day,
 			Hour,
 			Minute,
 			Second
 		);

Next we relate the entities to one another. The keys are surrogates, so they are not visible. I am building a set of relationships from left to right on each row and a set of relationships top to bottom on each column:

RELATE 	RelationshipName
 	(	MOTIVE.Virtue 	TO MOTIVE.Unity,
		MOTIVE.Unity	TO MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Esteem 	TO MOTIVE.Accord,
 		MOTIVE.Accord 	TO MOTIVE.Safety,
 		MOTIVE.Safety 	TO MOTIVE.Entity
		MOTIVE.Mantra 	TO PERSON.Creator,
 		PERSON.Creator  TO OBJECT.Motive,
 		OBJECT.Motive 	TO METHOD.Create,
 		METHOD.Create 	TO LOCALE.ExtraNet,
 		LOCALE.ExtraNet	TO MOMENT.Year
 		PERSON.Creator 	TO PERSON.Leader,
 		PERSON.Leader 	TO PERSON.Patron,
 		PERSON.Patron 	TO PERSON.Member,
 		PERSON.Member 	TO PERSON.Friend,
 		PERSON.Friend 	TO PERSON.Teller,
		MOTIVE.Unity 	TO PERSON.Leader,
 		PERSON.Leader	TO OBJECT.Person,
 		OBJECT.Person	TO METHOD.Relate,
 		METHOD.Relate	TO LOCALE.InterNet,
		...
 	);

This gives us the following entities composing our Structured Thinking System (STS):

stl-entities-03.jpg

As you can see, the order of the columns have been changed. You can also see that I have changed the color coding of the hats and coats to better reflect common usage in the industry (ie. Black Hat = Secure). I also think I am coming more into line with de Bono, but the jury is still out on that one.

Another issue raised in making the relationships is they are one to many as they proceed left to right across the rows and one to many as they proceed down the columns. There is no compromise to this if the system is to work at peak effectiveness.

There is no need for normalization or denormalization as the structure is fully normalized. There is also no need for attributes because they are identical for every entity:

  • Motive
  • Person
  • Object
  • Method
  • Locale
  • Moment

I am at a turning point here. I have to go deeper into the model to determine how to create attributes. Which I have not yet attempted. I have to save it for later posts.

Now we can create our reports. This is an alternate function of the six verbs that occurred to me. Note that the selected cells are all adjacent to one another either horizontally or vertically and flow from left to right; top to bottom:

REPORT	ReportName
 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Accord,
 		PERSON.Member,
 		OBJECT.Method,
 		METHOD.Record,
 		METHOD.Afford,
 		LOCALE.IntraNode,
 		MOMENT.Minute
 	);

Giving us the following Report:

If you want to throw in some filters it is easy:

REPORT	ReportName 

 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		MOTIVE.Accord,
 		PERSON.Member = John Doe,
 		OBJECT.Method,
 		METHOD.Record,
 		METHOD.Afford,
 		LOCALE.IntraNode,
 		MOMENT.Minute = 30 	);

The “30” aggregates to every 30 minutes.

Now we can plan our data capture. Again an alternate use for the RECORD verb. Again the cells for capture are all adjacent to the left or down:

RECORD	RecordName
 	(	MOTIVE.Esteem,
 		PERSON.Patron,
 		PERSON.Member,
 		OBJECT.Method
 );

This would create the following form:

Here we set up the affordances for the entities:

AFFORD	AffordName
 		RECORD.RecordName
	TO 	PERSON.Member;

Finally, we execute the RECORD Script and as the Member isn’t given the Member must log in:

ENGAGE	EngageName
 	(	RECORD.RecordName
	AND	PERSON.Member
	);

The code I have created here is a radical departure from the syntax releases I have come out with so far as I realized what the design was leading me to create. And that is the clincher. The design brought itself out. I have just been trying to follow it along.

What I am finding is there are not four verbs–Select, Insert, Update, Delete–but six–create, relate, report, record, afford and engage!

Related Posts:

Systema: Seven Hats, Seven Links

STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.3

I had a bit of an epiphany today. What I realized is that by structuring Structured Thinking Language as I have, everything can evolve as lists. Each VERB is simply the addition of another list to the NOUN you are working with.

Six Verbs: CREATE, RELATE, REPORT, RECORD, AFFORD, ENGAGE

Six Nouns: MOTIVE, LOCALE, OBJECT, METHOD, PERSON, MOMENT

Four Adjectives: INDUCED, DEDUCED and IMPLICIT, EXPLICIT

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN
        (   nounname_1,
            ...,
            nounname_n
        );       

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname TO
                (    NOUN_1.nounname_1,
                     ...,
                     NOUN_n.nounname_n
                );         

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
                (    attributename_1,
                     ...,
                     attributename_n
                );       

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename
                (    constraintname_1,
                     ...,
                     constraintname_n
                );         

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
                (    SELECT
                     INSERT,
                     UPDATE,
                     DELETE
                )
                ON
                (   NOUN_1.nounname_1,
                    ...,
                    NOUN_n.nounname_n
                );         

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE

Obviously, it still needs work, but we can see where the Structured Thinking Language adds value to the design process. SQL does have it’s place in data manipulation. However, STL has a place in data definition. See the related posts for background information on this syntax.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.3

SQL Designer

sqldesigner.jpg

Came across this interesting online database design tool demo called SQL Designer.

Give it a go!

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STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.2

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

I find I hated the Six Hats being six adjectives in STL R0.1 so I am changing them back to verbs:

  1. CREATE refers to the creation of entities. Meaning. Capability.
  2. RELATE refers to the creation of relationships. Uniqueness. Portability.
  3. REPORT refers to the creation of attributes. Value. Reliability.
  4. RECORD refers to the creation of constraints. Business Plan. Profitability.
  5. AFFORD refers to the creation of affordances. Adoption. Usability.
  6. ENGAGE refers to the creation of manipulations. Evangelism. Availability.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r02_1.jpg

INDUCE and DEDUCE will be changed to the adjectives INDUCED and DEDUCED.

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on Release 0.2 of the syntax:

CREATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname;

RELATE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
     NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                ); 

REPORT INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename; 

RECORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname; 

AFFORD INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
    NOUN.nounname
 	(	SELECT,
 		INSERT,
 		UPDATE,
 		DELETE
 	); 

ENGAGE INDUCED|DEDUCED IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
SELECT|INSERT|UPDATE|DELETE
    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

That’s it for now. Time to get some sleep.

Related Posts:

Structured Thinking Language R0.2

STL: Structured Thinking Language R0.1

The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.
Arthur Koestler

Since I posted STL: Structured Thinking Language and STL: Structured Thinking Language (remix), I have made quite a bit of progress in my thinking regarding the syntax of Structured Thinking Language.

The Six Hats are no longer verbs. There are only two verbs in STL, INDUCE and DEDUCE. INDUCE is a bottom up process of learning the structure of a system. DEDUCE is a top down process of teaching the structure of a system. INDUCE observes and orients. DEDUCE decides and acts. All STL statements begin with the INDUCE or DEDUCE verb to determine whether you are referring to an existing or a new system.

Each of the verbs can also be IMPLICIT or EXPLICIT according to the definitions found in Implicity and Explicity.

The Six Hats are now six adjectives:

  1. CONCEPTUAL refers to the creation of entities. Revise. Creativity. Meaning.
  2. CONTEXTUAL refers to the creation of relationships. Relate. Relativity. Uniqueness.
  3. LOGICAL refers to the creation of attributes. Report. Optimicity. Benefit.
  4. PHYSICAL refers to the creation of constraints. Record. Pessimicity. Cost.
  5. MECHANICAL refers to the creation of affordances. Intuit. Anthropicity. Usability.
  6. OPERATIONAL refers to the creation of manipulations. Engage. Synchronicity. Convenience.

The Six Coats remain the unchanged nouns:

  1. MOTIVE refers to the rules of the system.
  2. LOCALE refers to to the nodes of the system.
  3. OBJECT refers to the data of the system.
  4. METHOD refers to the functions of the system.
  5. PERSON refers to the people of the system.
  6. MOMENT refers to the events of the system.

Giving us the following:

stl_r01_3.jpg

Now that we have the verbs, adjectives and nouns of STL we can work on the syntax:

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
CONCEPTUAL NOUN.nounname;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
CONTEXTUAL NOUN.nounname
                (   MOTIVE.motivename,
                    LOCALE.localename,
                    OBJECT.objectname,
                    METHOD.methodname,
                    PERSON.personname,
                    MOMENT.momentname
                );    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
LOGICAL     NOUN.nounname.attributename;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
PHYSICAL    NOUN.nounname.attributename.constraintname;    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
MECHANICAL      NOUN.nounname
		(	select,
			insert,
			update,
			delete
		);    

INDUCE|DEDUCE IMPLICIT|EXPLICIT
OPERATIONAL    NOUN.nounname.attributename.value;

NOUN can be any one of the Six Coats nouns. Noun name can be any name unique for that specific noun. Cardinality of context is always one to many be the relationship associative, relative or recursive. A noun has multiple attributes each with a constraint, affordances and ultimately a value.  Note I do not call mechanical access “privileges”.  I prefer “affordances”.

Structured Thinking Language R0.1

Systema: Observe, Orient, Decide and Act

john_r_boyd_2.jpg

Colonel John R. Boyd of the United States Airforce was a top fighter pilot who in his later years refined his understanding of arial combat into a four step lifecycle:

  1. Observe
  2. Orient
  3. Decide
  4. Act

which came to be known as the OODA Loop. The objective was simple, increase the frequency of your effective strikes to a rate faster than your opponent to disorient him and achieve victory. The diagram to illustrate this, however is less than obvious:

oodaloop02.jpg

As an alternative I prefer the sine wave presentation:

ooda_loop_2.jpg

In this way we can have a better understanding of the OODA Loop over a period of time. Each time you cross the horizontal red axis you strike. One thing that must be noted is that the loop of the system in combat is different than the loop of the system in dialog. The combat loop of System A is closed. It does not wait for the target system to receive input or transmit output. In the following diagram System A is cycling much faster than System B and consequently striking more often:

ooda_loop_03.jpg

Another quality of the OODA Loop is there is the entire cycle does not need to be completed. The following patterns are possible:

ooda_loop_04.jpg

The shape of the cycle is irrelevant as long as you are able to complete the cycle more rapidly than your opponent. This is termed as being “inside the opponent’s loop”.

Another aspect is the ability to “push down” the amplitude of each cycle through proper training. You can act without orientation or decision being necessary if you have conditioned your system to provide the correct response to a given state.

And all of this fits in nicely with the Structured Thinking Lifecycle:

ooda_loop_01.jpg

The difference is that Boyd has:

  1. Factored Repeat, Refine, Record into Observe
  2. Factored Report, Relate, Revise into Orient
  3. Factored Revise, Relate, Report into Decide
  4. Factored Record, Refine, Repeat into Act

Thus, the OODA Loop and the Structured Thinking Lifecycle complement each other nicely. All you have to do is choose your medium.

Systema: Opportunity vs. Chance

I have just been reading a post by Marc Andreessen regarding Dr. James Austin’s book Chase, Chance and Creativity. I have to say Austin was onto something, but chance is a lot of poppycock.

Austin says there are four categories of chance:

  1. Uninfluenced Chance.
  2. Active Chance.
  3. Receptive Chance.
  4. Personal Chance.

Uninfluenced chance just happens to you. Active chance happens because you are active in your environment. Receptive chance happens because you have a body of knowledge that makes you receptive to your environment. Personal chance happens because your uniqueness as an individual makes you uniquely active and receptive to your environment.

I think “chance” is the wrong word. Austin defines chance as “something fortuitous that happens unpredictably without discernable human intention.” I don’t look at things that way.

Personally, I believe there is only opportunity. Opportunities are always presenting themselves and it is simply a matter of induction and deduction that determines whether we take advantage of them.

inducededuce.jpg

The opportunities that we have depend upon which systems we are inducing and deducing with. There is no magic called “chance”. The variety of systems we induce and deduce with determine the variety of opportunities we have. The variety of systems we induce and deduce with also determines the content and structure of our system which influences what we are capable of inducing and deducing when the next opportunity presents itself. Finally, the more divergent the systems we induce and deduce with are from the norm the more likely we are to encounter novel opportunities.

Opportunity is every system we interact with outside ourselves whether we initiate that interaction or not.

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