Green Hatting a Website

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Green Hatting in the Six Hats, Six Coats metaphor is about the conceptual perspective of a system.  Edward de Bono calls this the creative hat.

Green Hats take the feedback provided by the other five hats and look for the an opportunity to improve the quality of life, right a wrong or prevent the end of something good. In the Green Hat perspective designers evaluate goals, networks, data, processes, people and times that could, should or would exist. Green Hat conceptual design is used by the Yellow Hat contextual design team.

Like the other hats, the Green Hat is worn with each of the Six Coats. The basic question is what is the greatest benefit we can offer.

Green Hat, Green Coat: What is our meaning?

Green Hat, Yellow Coat: Why are we navigating?

Green Hat, White Coat: Why do we need data?

Green Hat, Black Coat: Why do we process?

Green Hat, Red Coat: Why are we personas?

Green Hat, Blue Coat: Why do we need convenience?

Green Hat also has a reverse purpose when variances occur in the transacting system. Green Hats decide how to handle a opportunity which is to insert a new product or service for the system to accomodate the exception. The buck stops here.

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Yellow Hatting a Website

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Yellow Hatting in the Six Hats, Six Coats metaphor is about the contextual perspective of a system.  Edward de Bono does not have a hat for this perspective.

Yellow Hats take the conceptual design provided by the Green Hats and look for the niche market. In the Yellow Hat perspective designers evaluate goals, networks, data, processes, people and times that require products or services within the conceptual domain. Yellow Hat contextual design is used by the White Hat logical design team.

Like the other hats, the Yellow Hat is worn with each of the Six Coats. The basic question is what is the most unique product or service we can make available within the conceptual domain.

Yellow Hat, Green Coat: What is our unique product or service mantra?

Yellow Hat, Yellow Coat: Where are we navigating?

Yellow Hat, White Coat: Where is our data?

Yellow Hat, Black Coat: Where are our processes?

Yellow Hat, Red Coat: Where are our personas?

Yellow Hat, Blue Coat: Where are we convenient?

Yellow Hat also has a reverse purpose when variances occur in the transacting system. Yellow Hats decide how to handle a deviation which is to select a new product or service for the system to accomodate the exception or to escalate it up to the Green Hats.

White Hatting a Website

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White Hatting in the Six Hats, Six Coats metaphor is about the logical perspective of a system.  Edward de Bono calls this the optimist’s hat.

White Hats take the contextual design provided by the Yellow Hats and exprore it to its full extent. In the White Hat perspective designers optimize goals, networks, data, processes, people and times to theoretical limits. White Hat logical design is used by the Black Hat physical design team.

Like the other hats, the White Hat is worn with each of the Six Coats. The basic question is what are the logical limits within the context.

White Hat, Green Coat: How do we achieve maximum value for the customer?

White Hat, Yellow Coat: What are we navigating?

White Hat, White Coat: What is our data?

White Hat, Black Coat: What are our processes?

White Hat, Red Coat: What are our personas?

White Hat, Blue Coat: What is our peak performance?

White Hat also has a reverse purpose when variances occur in the transacting system. White Hats decide how to handle a variance which is to alter the system to accomodate the exception or to escalate it up to the Yellow Hats.

Start Art

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The Art of the Start by Guy Kawasaki, appeals to what I consider the spirit of the Six Hats, Six Coats and Six Rings metaphor. There is an emphasis on two things, brevity and clarity or, better put, simplicity with attitude. Guy is a great speaker. I urge you to read his book and visit his site (see my Links widget).

His ten lessons from his speech on Start Ups:

  1. Make Meaning
    1. Increase the Quality of Life
    2. Right a Wrong
    3. Prevent the End of Something Good
  2. Make Mantra
    1. Wendy’s “Healthy Fast Food”
    2. FedEx “Peace of Mind”
    3. Nike “Authentic Athletic Performance”
    4. Target “Democratize Design”
  3. Get Going
    1. Think Different
    2. Polarize People
    3. Find a Few Soul Mates
  4. Define a Business Model
    1. Be Specific
    2. Keep It Simple
    3. Ask Women
  5. Weave a MAT (Milestones, Assumptions, Tasks)
    1. Milestone “Finish Design”
    2. Assumption “Sales Calls/Day”
    3. Task “Rent an Office”
  6. Niche Thyself
    1. High Ability to Provide a Unique Product or Service
    2. High Value to the Customer
  7. Follow the 10/20/30 Rule
    1. 10 Slides
      1. Title
      2. Problem
      3. Solution
      4. Business Model
      5. Underlying Magic
      6. Marketing and Sales
      7. Competition
      8. Team
      9. Projections
      10. Status and Timeline
    2. 20 Minutes
    3. 30 Point Font
  8. Hire Infected People
    1. Ignore the Irrelevant
    2. Hire Better Than Yourself
    3. Apply the Shopping Center Test
  9. Lower the Barriers to Adoption
    1. Flatten the Learning Curve
    2. Don’t Ask People to Do Something You Wouldn’t
    3. Embrace Your Evangelists
  10. Seed the Clouds
    1. Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom
    2. Enable Test Drives
    3. Find the Influencers
  11. Don’t Let the Bozos Grind You Down
    1. The Smartest, Most Successful, Highest Positioned Have Been Wrong